Oil resumes slide as fears persist over looming supply surplus

A pumpjack operates above an oil well in the Bakken Formation outside Williston, North Dakota, U.S., on Friday, March 9, 2018. When oil sold for $100 a barrel, many oil towns dotting the nation's shale basins grew faster than its infrastructure and services could handle. Since 2015, as oil prices floundered, Williston has added new roads, including a truck route around the city, two new fire stations, expanded the landfill, opened a new waste water treatment plant and started work on an airport relocation and expansion project. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg
A pumpjack operates above an oil well in the Bakken Formation outside Williston, North Dakota, U.S., on Friday, March 9, 2018. When oil sold for $100 a barrel, many oil towns dotting the nation's shale basins grew faster than its infrastructure and services could handle. Since 2015, as oil prices floundered, Williston has added new roads, including a truck route around the city, two new fire stations, expanded the landfill, opened a new waste water treatment plant and started work on an airport relocation and expansion project. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

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