Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Amec adds BDR’s expertise to Canadian oilsand operations

Amec adds BDR’s expertise to Canadian oilsand operations
Amec has made a strategic acquisition in Canada designed to reinforce its already strong position in helping the extraction of oil and gas from the tar sands of Alberta.

Amec has made a strategic acquisition in Canada designed to reinforce its already strong position in helping the extraction of oil and gas from the tar sands of Alberta.

The increasingly international engineering and project-management group is buying, for £22million in cash, Bower Damberger Rolseth Engineering (BDR).

Calgary-based BDR focuses on technical engineering services to the in-situ production of viable oil and gas from the sands. With 85 employees, it has a particular expertise in thermal recovery of oil through its steam-assisted gravity-drainage methods.

In-situ deposits are those which lie too far below the surface to be recovered by open-cast mining and therefore require a different approach to extraction.

Amec said BDR’s reputation and capability in this part of the oilsand sector fitted neatly with its existing position and expertise in oil sands, where it is increasingly regarded as the market leader in the provision of upstream engineering services and project management to the surface mining sector.

Amec has been involved in every mineable oilsand project in Alberta since the early 1990s. Out of the group’s 3,500-strong North America workforce, some 1,500 are engaged in the oilsand business alone. It is led by Peter Madden, formerly head of projects based in London.

The key to building the Alberta position was the acquisition of Canadian company Agra in 2000, since when Amec has applied North Sea-honed safety thinking and project management in Alberta. A source said that, not even in Aberdeen was it realised just how big the engagement with oil sands by companies in Europe’s energy capital is. It is a business opportunity that has been promoted by Scottish Enterprise/Scottish Development International.

Amec chief executive Samir Brikho said of the BDR deal: “This is an important acquisition for Amec and one which enhances our position in the fast growing Canadian oilsand market.”

Neil Bruce, chief operating officer of Amec’s natural resources arm, said: “By comb-ining Amec’s leading position in the mineable segment and BDR’s strong reputation in in-situ extraction, we are creating a capability that is well positioned in a market with good growth prospects.”

Both Mr Brikho and Mr Bruce are in Houston this week for OTC.

Mr Brikho said energy offered a huge opportunity for British firms and that there was no reason why the sector could not account for a million UK jobs by 2030; roughly twice the current headcount.

Mr Bruce is to speak about the growing importance of national oil companies as clients to the supply chain.

More from Energy Voice

Latest Posts