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Warwick school launches Global Energy Master’s

Warwick school launches Global Energy Master’s
How will we meet the world's changing needs for energy? The global energy industry faces challenges from growing demand in developing economies, alternative sources of supply, climate change, regulation and energy security.

How will we meet the world’s changing needs for energy? The global energy industry faces challenges from growing demand in developing economies, alternative sources of supply, climate change, regulation and energy security.

Warwick Business School says its new Global Energy MBA will help you make the right decisions and overcome these challenges.

It is true that visionary managers require a broader understanding of the global industry than ever before.

What will be the complex mix of energy we will use in the future? How will the changing roles of companies and institutions across the world evolve?

How will regulation and politics affect investment and growth?

To answer such questions and more, Warwick says it is bringing together people from a wide range of sectors involved in the energy industry, combining their experience with teaching skills and getting ready for the first batch of students in the autumn.

As Warwick’s marketing literature says: “This is your opportunity to increase your strategic understanding of the energy industry … boost your career and take a role in shaping the energy industry of the future.”

It boasts: “You will leave our programme with the leadership skills and critical understanding of the industry to help you and your company seize the opportunities ahead.”

David Elmes, academic director, is right to say that any company in the energy industry now faces significant changes and uncertainties.

They include:

The challenge of meeting demand from oil&gas while accelerating alternative, renewable sources of energy.

The changing roles of national and international companies.

The increasing influence of Governments keen to ensure supply.

The colossal challenge of meeting energy needs while developing a low-carbon economy.

“Managers need a broader understanding of the industry, the skills to establish partnerships across the globe and the critical thinking to see options that are possible,” says Elmes.

“Our part-time programme also recognises the industry’s need for top-tier talent by allowing you to accelerate your career while continuing in the workplace.

“Our world-leading blended-learning expertise has allowed us to combine interactive self-study and face-to-face time with leading academics, industry experts and your fellow participants.

“We know the global nature of this industry.”

Elmes joined WBS as academic director for the Warwick Global Energy MBA after more than 20 years working in the energy and management consulting industries.

He has previously worked at BP and for CapGemini, where he was vice-president for the UK energy, utilities and chemicals team.

More recently he was at Schlumberger as VP and director in the team which created the firm’s management consulting arm, Schlumberger Business Consulting.

For more information, see

http://www.wbs.ac.uk/

students/mba/global-energy/welcome.cfm

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