Aberdeen to twin with Guyana capital city

ENERGY VOICE ; Frederick Hamley Case, Guyana High Commissioner to the UK. Picture by Kami Thomson 27-11-18
Guyana's high commissioner to the UK, Frederick Hamley Case, pictured outside Aberdeen's Marishcal College

Aberdeen will be officially twinned next month with a country that has one of world’s fastest-growing oil and gas industries.

The Granite City will be twinned with Guyana’s capital of Georgetown at a ceremony on March 15th, attended by Lord Provost Barney Crockett, the Guyanese ambassador to the UK and Georgetown’s Mayor.

Guyana was recently listed among the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere before massive oil reserves were found off the country’s coast by ExxonMobil in 2015.

It is now looking at recoverable oil reserves of five billion barrels, and that number is still growing with more discoveries steadily being made.

The country, larger than Scotland and England combined but with a population of just 750,000, is widely untrained in oil and gas disciplines and is forging a link with Aberdeen to solve the problem.

Guyanese ambassador to the UK, Frederick Hamley Case, was visiting Aberdeen yesterday in preparation of next month’s event, brokered by Abis Energy.

He said: “I’m very excited, I will be there. I think the President and the Governor are also looking forward to it because first oil will start coming on stream next year,with a bit of luck it will be late this year, so there’s a rush to prepare Guyanese people to have an active and meaningful participation in the industry.

“We have Guyanese people trained in all sorts of disciplines but none in oil and gas for the simple reason that, until recently, we did not think we had that resource.

“There’s a lot of potential, it still is a poor country at this moment in time.

“We’re currently looking at a GDP of 3.5 billion and Aberdeen itself has a GDP of 65 billion so you can see the scale.

“Once we get things rolling and manage it properly, everyone in Guyana – man, woman and child –can have a decent living and aspire to whatever they want to aspire to, we have the means to do that.

“It’s a game-changer in a big way.”

There will be a reciprocal event held at the Guyana High Commission in London on the 28th March.

A trade mission was held in Aberdeen at the end of last year, with dozens of companies now forging links with Aberdeen counterparts.

Work is also ongoing between Aberdeen University, Edinburgh’s Heriot-Watt uni and the University of Guyana to establish an oil and gas faculty in the country.

SCOTTISH NAMES

As well as its expertise, Aberdeen has the advantage of having the same language and similar customs as Guyana, which is part of the Commonwealth, over other oil-rich nations like Norway.

Mr Case added that there are strong links already in place between Guyana and Scotland.

“Our culture is more similar to Britain and Scotland than it is to Norway or other Scandinavian countries,” he said.

“A lot of Guyanese people have Scottish names, we have lots of Macphersons, McAllister’s, thousands of Frasers.

“My best friend at secondary school in Guyana, who looks like me in terms of complexion and ethnicity, was Lawrence Macgregor Stewart.  You can’t get more Scottish than that!”

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