Decommissioning technology showcase plots route through valley of death

Decom North Sea's Decommissioning Technology Information Platform at Aker Solutions, Dyce.
Picture of Ian Philips, (CEO, OGIC).

Picture by KENNY ELRICK     15/09/2016
Decom North Sea's Decommissioning Technology Information Platform at Aker Solutions, Dyce. Picture of Ian Philips, (CEO, OGIC). Picture by KENNY ELRICK 15/09/2016

Ice pigging, oil-spotting satellites, plasmabits and tyre mattresses were among the technologies on show at a decommissioning industry event in Aberdeen yesterday.

In all, 10 companies showcased their cost cutting products and processes in front of more than 100 people at the decommissioning technology innovation platform, organised by Decom North Sea and the Oil and Gas Innovation Centre.

The event focused on a range of technologies, from those which are at an early stage of development and need funding, to those that are practically ready for use and just need their first client.

Aubin introduced the audience to its DeepBuoy system, which uses buoyant materials to provide a safer and more precise subsea lift, while GA Drilling delivered a presentation on its patented Plasmabit, saying the drilling and milling tool could cut North Sea plugging and abandonment costs by $1.5billion.

Inpipe Products explained the virtues of transfering ice pigging from the water and food industries to oil and gas. The process involves forcing an ice slurry through a pipe to clean out sediment and unwanted deposits.

Telespazio, Ocean Power Technologies, qedi, Return to Scene, Scour Prevention Systems, Subsea Deployment System and Sureclean also delivered presentations.

OGIC chief executive Ian Phillips provided an overview of the range of funding opportunities open to companies with pioneering new technologies.

Mr Phillips said Nasa had come up with a nine point scale to define the maturity of technologies, with levels one to three denoting innovations which are at the research stage, and stage nine referring to products which are available to buy and use today.

He said companies needed most support to bridge the “valley of death”, the gap between the research stage and the post-trialling and deployment phase.

OGIC is an organisation that helps firms develop innovative products by pairing them up with experts from Scottish universities and providing match funding.

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