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Unite: Ineos’ Forties pipeline deal bad for the country

Unite Scottish Secretary Pat Rafferty
Pat Rafferty

A trade union warned today that Ineos’ acquisition of the Forties pipeline from BP is bad for the country.

Unite has called for politicians in Westminster and Holyrood to make clear whether they think the sale is in the national interest.

Unite previously said it would be dangerous to hand over the system to Ineos, controlled by billionaire Jim Ratcliffe, as the Swiss firm already owns Grangemouth refinery.

Forties transports 450,000 barrels a day – about 40% of the UK’s total oil production.

Unite Scottish secretary Pat Rafferty said the transaction would give one man, Mr Ratcliffe, the power to bring the UK to a standstill.

Rafferty said today: “It’s not so long ago that both Grangemouth and the Forties pipeline were owned by all of us, and operated by a nationalised British Petroleum with a responsibility to look at what was good for the country as a whole, not just what was good for a small group of wealthy individuals.

“Both these parts of vital national infrastructure – which are central to the success of the Scottish and wider UK economy are now essentially in the hands of one man.

“Unite firmly believes that this sale is bad for Scotland and the UK. We demand that both the Scottish and Westminster parliament carry out inquiries, and that every MSP and MP in Scotland has a responsibility to make their position clear. Do they believe this sale is in the national interest?”

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