Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Oil and gas impact ‘not bad enough for business rates relief’

James Bream, research and policy director at the Aberdeen and Grampian Chamber of Commerce
thebusiness lunch at Entier, The Olive House, Westhill, hosted by Erikka Askeland, with Peter Bruce, Entier Chief Executive, James Bream, Aberdeen & Grampian Chamber of Commerce and Colin Black, director of the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Pictured - James Bream, Aberdeen & Grampian Chamber of Commerce. Picture by Kami Thomson 16-09-15

The Grampian rates assessor will tell a court today that the collapse of the oil price does not constitute a “material change in circumstances” for the north-east and the business rates the region should pay.

The Aberdeen Valuation Appeal Committee previously ruled that the crash in 2014 did amount to a change, meaning firms could seek relief on their business rates.

But now the decision will be appealed at the Court of Session in Edinburgh, whose verdict will be final.

The Grampian rates assessor claims that there was no significant economic downturn in the region after 2014 and, as such, there was no need to alter business rates. But much expert opinion has formed the opposite conclusion.

Mike Rose, of CBRE Rating (Scotland), expressed hope that the Court of Session would not overturn the result.

He said: “In our view, the severe economic downturn in north-east Scotland is a fact that can and should be treated as a material change of circumstances.”

The 2008 recession was ruled a change in circumstance by the Court of Session in 2010, which allowed business rates in the central belt to be reduced accordingly.

Mr Rose said he hoped the process would be repeated in the north-east if the ruling goes in his favour. He said: “We hope the Lands Valuation Appeal Court will accept the downturn in the north-east is a material change in circumstance, enabling the rate relief that so many north-east ratepayers need in this period of economic difficulty, just as many central belt ratepayers did in 2009 when their circumstances changed.”

James Bream, director of policy and research at Aberdeen and Grampian Chamber of Commerce, said the change in circumstances had been “exceptional”.

He said: “We provided economic analysis to support CBRE because we believed the impact of the oil and gas downturn had materially altered the economic performance of the north-east of Scotland.

“It was our strong opinion that the region would be disproportionately affected further by the business rates revaluation and we felt the rating process should take account of this exceptional change in circumstances.”

The case is expected to last two days.

Recommended for you


More from Energy Voice

Latest Posts