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British public “don’t know enough” about nuclear power

Sizewell B nuclear power net zero
Sizewell B, the last nuclear power plant built in the UK.

A new survey has shown 40% of the British public “don’t know enough” about nuclear power.

The figures come as its shown nuclear energy makes up almost half of all low-carbon electricity generation.

The fresh data was collated by Love Energy Savings and asked more than 700 people is they would support an increased use of nuclear energy.

It was found that 40% believed they didn’t know enough about the subject to have an informed opinion on whether or not increased reliance on nuclear energy is a good or bad thing.

Phil Foster, managing director of Love Energy Savings, said:“Given nuclear power’s growing prominence in the energy industry, it was surprising to discover that so many people don’t understand the subject enough to make an informed decision on whether they support its use.

“With fossil fuel stocks decreasing rapidly, we will undoubtedly need to turn to alternatives such as nuclear power. It’d be great if we could rely solely on energy derived from sustainable sources such as wind, solar and tidal power, but we’re a long way from achieving this and we must be realistic.

“Regardless of whether you’re for or against nuclear power, we believe that people should try to understand where their energy is coming from.”

Love Energy said despite the public’s lack of understanding on the subject, nuclear power is continuing to grow in prominence across the world.

In July 2015, 438 nuclear reactors were in operation in 30 countries with 67 under construction in 15 countries.

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