Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

It happened by chance, sort of

It happened by chance, sort of
This month's Oil & Gas UK Next Generation conference in Aberdeen is expected to attract hundreds of young energy professionals from the full gamut of disciplines.

This month’s Oil & Gas UK Next Generation conference in Aberdeen is expected to attract hundreds of young energy professionals from the full gamut of disciplines.

One of the delegates will be Charlie (Charlotte) Hamilton, a 23-year-old associate geoscientist at Maersk Oil North Sea UK. Like many, she hadn’t planned on a career in upstream petroleum. It sort of happened by chance.

“My decision to study geology came from the film, Jurassic Park, and a love of fossil hunting on beaches,” says Hamilton.

“My desire to become a palaeontologist led to a GCSE and A level in geology, then on to a BSc at Edinburgh University, which provided me with a strong foundation in all aspects of geoscience.

“It was in my third year at Edinburgh that I completed a hydrocarbon course and realised that this stuff was actually pretty interesting, so I began thinking about working in the oil industry.

“I would be able to travel all over the world, experience working offshore, go on field trips to weird and wonderful places, be at the forefront of technological advance … not to mention the impressive salary that I stood to earn.”

After deciding this was the career for her, Hamilton applied to the Integrated Petroleum Geology MSc at Aberdeen University – an essential vocational link into the energy industry.

“During my Masters, I was given the opportunity to compete in the AAPG Barrel Award, which is a competition that aims to give students the chance to work an exploration project from start to finish.

“Our team had six weeks to change a few wells and some rather challenging seismic into a seamless presentation detailing prospects and risk analysis. This presentation was given to a panel of industry experts … that was nerve-racking at the time, but an invaluable experience.

“After graduating in 2007, I joined Maersk Oil in Aberdeen. I liked the company’s graduate programme as it allowed me to rotate to a number of different departments, improving my knowledge in all areas.”

Hamilton is currently working in exploration, completing a study on Upper Jurassic sand distributions in the Outer Moray Firth, but will shortly be rotating to rock physics, then into operations geology.

“I have also been given the opportunity to join the Maersk International Technology and Science programme (MITAS) … a two-year programme that combines challenging hands-on experience with theoretical learning, aiming to fast-track new graduates to becoming technological leaders/specialists in the AP Moller Maersk Group.

“The theoretical learning includes courses such as project management and process excellence while also giving you the chance to hone your leadership and teamwork skills.

“The major benefit of the programme is the opportunity to network with other Maersk people from different business units and from all over the world.

“But if you asked me 10 years ago where I thought I would be now I probably would not have said working for an oil company. However, I am confident I made the right choice. Although my career has only just begun, I like the way it’s going so far.”

Recommended for you

More from Energy Voice

Latest Posts