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Hydrogen

Hydrogen

Blue hydrogen – what is it, and should it replace natural gas?

Blue hydrogen is often touted as a low-carbon fuel for generating electricity and storing energy, powering cars, trucks and trains and heating buildings. But according to a new report by Cornell and Stanford University researchers in the US, it may be no better for the climate – and potentially a fair bit worse – than continuing to use fossil natural gas, which currently keeps 85% of UK homes warm. In the US, about half of all homes use natural gas for space and water heating.

Hydrogen

Green hydrogen – premium product or commodity fuel?

In this article, we ask whether green hydrogen production has the potential to be scaled to make a significant contribution to achieving net-zero UK by 2050 or whether it will remain a relatively niche application. Gavin Bollan, Technical Director at ITPEnergised steps through constraints and opportunities throughout the green hydrogen supply chain – from storage and transportation to the point of use and the potential for future consumption. He discusses the UK’s potential as a green hydrogen producer, and some of the technical and policy hurdles which must be overcome to achieve a step-change in consumer uptake. Will the scale of domestic natural gas production and an existing distribution network mean blue, fossil-derived hydrogen outmuscles its smaller, greener brother, or is this just a temporary step in a gradual weaning from fossil energy?