Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Walking the talk

Walking the talk
"INITIATIVE rich but action poor" - that's how our industry has been described. There has certainly been no shortage of ideas about how we can improve our methods of working to take cost out of the supply chain; but sometimes the pace of the uptake of initiatives leaves more than a little to be desired.

“INITIATIVE rich but action poor” – that’s how our industry has been described. There has certainly been no shortage of ideas about how we can improve our methods of working to take cost out of the supply chain; but sometimes the pace of the uptake of initiatives leaves more than a little to be desired.

Take, for example, the Supply Chain Code of Practice, to which almost all the big names in the UKCS are signatories. Now in its seventh year, the code remains “aspirational” and no organisation can claim to be fully compliant. The code covers aspects such as use of standard contracts and model invitation to tenders, the fair and consistent use of First Point Assessment and, perhaps highest on the agenda of SMEs, adherence to the 30-days payment cycle. Each year, Oil & Gas UK monitors compliance to the code by means of a survey, and the most recent report noted that “there has been a moderate decline in the parameters used to assess compliance”.

While this may sound bad, the statement masks a number of very positive facts about this sector. Firstly, it is an unusually well co-ordinated industry with a number of sharing initiatives such as the annual Share Fairs, Vantage POB and FPAL. The survey noted that 42% of invoices were settled in 30 days and, while this needs to be improved on, it is a figure that almost every other British industry would envy. Corruption is almost unheard of now, whereas a Chartered Institute of Building survey in 2006 found that 41% of respondents had been offered a bribe.

So we are pretty good at “walking the talk”; but, we believe, in no way complacent. The FPAL steering committee wants to redouble its efforts in 2009 to promote the consistent use of the supply chain’s North Sea gateway, especially with the advent of the new FPAL Advanced Registration, which promises to take further cost out of the supply chain.

Visit www.fpal.com for more about what the FPAL Advanced Registration can do for you

Recommended for you

More from Energy Voice

Latest Posts