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New boss at Pelamis Wave Power

New boss at Pelamis Wave Power
THE company behind what could be the Western Isles' first wavefarm has a new chief executive.

THE company behind what could be the Western Isles’ first wavefarm has a new chief executive.

Per Hornung Pedersen has taken over the role at Edinburgh-based Pelamis Wave Power.

He was previously chief executive at REpower Systems, an international wind-turbine manufacturer, and before that had helped to develop Indian wind-turbine manufacturer Suzlon Energy into a global player.

The firm said that, in his new role, Mr Pedersen would lead a strategic review of the Pelamis business aimed at allowing it to scale-up its manufacturing to commercial levels. He said: “Pelamis already has the technical platform to begin serial production of its machines. Together with our customers we will be the first to make wave energy a reality.”

Mr Pedersen replaces Neels Kriek, who left Pelamis late last year and is now managing director of Rubicon Management Consultants.

Pelamis is behind what could be Scotland’s first commercial wavefarm. The multimillion-pound development west of Lewis could be capable of powering 7,000 homes; more than meeting the requirements of a town the size of Stornoway.

Earlier this month the firm secured an agreement for a lease of the seabed to develop the 10-megawatt windfarm.

Meanwhile, Scotland’s marine energy industry was the focus of the UK parliament’s energy and climate-change select committee investigation into wave and tidal renewables, as it visited the European Marine Energy Centre (Emec) in Orkney.

Emec – the only accredited wave and tidal test centre for marine renewables in the world – welcomed the cross-party group, led by chairman Tim Yeo to its base at Stromness and testing sites around the islands.

The committee announced an inquiry recently into wave and tidal energy, investigating its potential to contribute towards the UK’s renewables and emissions targets.

It met Emec managing director Neil Kermode to discuss the potential for renewable devices such as those tested at the centre to meet UK emissions targets, and visited its wave-test site at Billia Croo to observe its innovative operations.

Accompanied by Mr Kermode and Michael Morrison of Orkney Islands Council Marine Services, the group of MPs also toured the Lyness marine renewables support base to view some of the wave-energy devices based there.

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