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Council backs campaign against giant windfarm

Council   backs  campaign against  giant  windfarm
ANTI-WINDFARM campaigners claimed yesterday that plans to build 43 turbines in Ross-shire "will forever disrupt" the lives of local residents.

ANTI-WINDFARM campaigners claimed yesterday that plans to build 43 turbines in Ross-shire “will forever disrupt” the lives of local residents.

Edinburgh-based renewable energy company Wind Energy (Glenmorie) has applied to the Scottish Government to build 43 turbines on hills between Ardross and Ardgay.

It is estimated the development could generate enough electricity to supply around 90,000 homes.

But local residents have objected to the project, claiming it would “blight a community already almost encircled by turbines”.

At a public meeting organised by Ardross Community Council, residents gave their unanimous backing to a campaign to block the proposals.

Council secretary John Edmondson said yesterday: “Our village already has a total of 65 wind turbines in its immediate surroundings, a planning application for two turbines has recently been submitted and there is another planning application imminent for a further 13 turbines, in addition to the 43 turbines planned at Glenmorie.

“This is a total of 125 for this small community — one turbine for every three people in Ardross.”

Mr Edmondson said the Glenmorie development would have “a significant impact on the views from Ben Wyvis and Cnoc Fyrish” and would disrupt the lives of residents living nearby.

He added: “The people and families who live and work in the area, whose lives they are about to be forever disrupted with these money-making schemes, are ordinary working people.

“They do not want the land to be ravaged so that rich men can make even more money.”

Developers claim, however, that public consultation has led to a “positive response” from the local community.

Project manager Natasha Rai added: “At our last public exhibitions, in May, three-quarters of respondents said they supported the proposal or had ‘no view’.

“We have reduced the scale of our original project and carefully designed the windfarm to limit any visual impact, as this was a key concern for residents.

“The topography of the site means that most of the windfarm will be hidden from the surrounding villages, while maintaining a suitable position for the turbines where there is good wind for producing electricity.”

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