Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Moray vessel operator hails renewables rise

BUSINESS BOOMING: Bill Ruck . . . said  rising demand meant he  had to add a second vessel to his fleet
BUSINESS BOOMING: Bill Ruck . . . said rising demand meant he had to add a second vessel to his fleet

A Moray chartered-vessel company said yesterday the rise of Scotland’s renewable-energy industry had trebled its turnover in three years.

Lossiemouth-based Moray First Marine (MFM) was set up in 2000 as Moray Diving Services, offering sports-diving and sea-angling trips.

The company has since sharpened its focus on the energy sector, allowing continued growth as the leisure market suffered in the recession.

Managing director Bill Ruck said the company started to take advantage of the region’s growing renewable-energy industry in 2005 after being chartered for work on the Beatrice windfarm project in the Moray Firth.

He added: “The commercial work included taking out survey teams for activities like mapping the seabed or monitoring whales and dolphins in the area.”

Mr Ruck said MFM, which employs four people, was now attracting more work in offshore renewables on the back of its experience in the oil and gas sector.

He added: “Our competitors can offer basic boats and let the client get on with it but we can offer a bit more knowledge and experience.”

Mr Ruck, who worked as a remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) supervisor for firms including Subsea 7 and Oceaneering before launching the company, said that rising demand meant he recently had to add a second vessel to his fleet.

He added: “Turnover has certainly increased a great deal from the days when we focused primarily on leisure; it was around £35,000 in 2008.

“It was a tough business, with inconsistent weather conditions, and when the recession hit people were spending a lot less on leisure activities.

“Turnover is now over £100,000 and still increasing, and we are expecting a good jump in 2014 as renewables projects start to ramp up.

“That is when the windfarm work really kicks off in the Moray Firth, but already this year we have been surprisingly busy given it is traditionally quieter in the winter months.”

Recommended for you

More from Energy Voice

Latest Posts