BP, Shell, Equinor, Total form ‘human rights’ joint force

A woman engineer working for Shell represents the culture shift that is taking place in workplaces across the UK
A woman engineer working for Shell represents the culture shift that is taking place in workplaces across the UK

The chiefs of BP, Shell, Equinor and Total are to join forces in an attempt to highlight suppliers who respect the human rights of their workforce.

Announced today, the agreement will see the oil firms look to “create a collaborative approach to human rights supplier assessments in the energy industry”.

The joint agreement would attempt to make it easier for firms who have a proven track record of good human rights practice to promote it.

But the firms also added that the agreement does not include “collaboration on selection of suppliers, which continues to remain the independent decision of each participant”.

A spokesman of Equinor said in a statement: “Participating companies recognise the importance of working with suppliers that respect human rights, in line with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, including the fundamental conventions of the International Labour Organization (ILO), and that care for their people.

“The objective of this initiative is to create an industry framework for human rights supplier assessments. Results of conducted assessments will be shared with the participating companies through an independent third party. Work is currently ongoing to establish the assessment criteria and sharing mechanism.”

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