Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Oceaneering puts 340 UK workers at risk of job cuts

Oceaneering
Oceaneering

Oceaneering has put more than 300 UK workers at risk of redundancy less than three months after opening a brand new regional headquarters in Aberdeen.

The oilfield services company confirmed it has started consultations with workers “throughout the UK” on cuts.

A total of 128 are expected to be made redundant, according to the Unite union, including around 50 in Aberdeen with the brunt being from the ROV department.

Around 20 jobs at Oceaneering’s manufacturing base in Rosyth are also expected to be cut, as well as asset integrity roles in other parts of the UK.

It comes after Oceaneering moved 300 workers into new offices in Dyce in March, which country manager Steven Cowie said “directly reflects Oceaneering’s commitment to the region and our customers”.

However, last month the Houston-headquartered firm posted a huge jump in its pre-tax losses at $397.8m (£313.7m), more than 13 times the $27.9m (£22m) deficit in the same period last year.

Oceaneering moved 300 workers into Aberdeen Business Park, alongside current occupants Aker Solutions, in March

The Covid-19 pandemic, and resulting oil downturn, led to heavy impairments and write-downs in the value of the company’s assets.

Additional cost cutting savings would be made in the second and third quarters, chief executive Roderick Larson said at the time.

Unite regional officer John Boland said: “It just shows how much of a crisis the North Sea and this whole offshore sector is in.

“I’ve got something like 14 consultations going on at the moment, either for redundancies, changes to rotas or cutting salaries.

“We had a meeting with the Scottish Energy minister Paul Wheelhouse last week and we said there that the offshore sector is in a crisis.

“It needs action taken now, not next year.”

Along with the office move, last August the subsea engineering firm also announced construction of a new workshop and yard at the D2 Business Park in Aberdeen, due for completion in mid-2020.

Oceaneering’s UK HQ oversees operations in the North Sea as well as international projects.

Last year the firm was accused of trying to “strong-arm” 40 workers in Aberdeen on to less favourable contracts.

Around 220 people are employed at Oceaneering’s manufacturing base in Rosyth, which covers three units of subsea distribution solutions (SBS), asset integrity and its tooling, rental and decommissioning services.

 

 

 

Recommended for you

More from Energy Voice

Latest Posts