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energy

Opinion

Decommissioning: beyond the challenges of oversupply, pandemic and recession

After weathering the storm that was the price collapse of 2014, the oil industry has again been hit in recent months by two new blows almost simultaneously: oversupply (caused by the failure of negotiations between Saudi Arabia and Russia to agree on production cuts and the aggressive response of the former); and a demand shock (reflecting the economic impact of the Covid-19 lockdown).

Opinion

How energy companies can respond now and plan for the future

Energy companies are used to weathering disruption of all kinds. And during this incredibly challenging time, we are now more than ever relying on them for the safe access and delivery of power, gas, water and other essential services. As governments around the world enact drastic measures to slow down transmission of the COVID-19 outbreak, energy companies are facing multiple challenges: from the health and well-being of employees to disruption in the supply chain and from working capital shortages to complete closure of operations. They have also been squeezed by a big drop in demand for both oil and natural gas, which has led to lockdowns, a collapse in industrial activity and travel bans all over the world. Oil prices have been sent crashing to their lowest level since 2001, while gas demand has fallen by as much as 20% in some cases.

Oil & Gas

CERAWeek energy summit cancelled over coronavirus

One of the world’s largest and most important energy industry gatherings was cancelled by organiser IHS Markit Ltd. on Sunday amid mounting concerns about the coronavirus outbreak. It was due to start March 9.